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We’ve Lost it: Didactic Poem

In a world lost and greatly confused,
The truth is often misconstrued.
Before us now are several gods,
To choose from, all at our own accord.
The creation is what we now worship,
While the Creator, we reject His lordship.

In a world heavily invaded,
By lies and deceit, a gift from Hades,
Our conscience we've hushed into silence,
Leading to an inevitable rape of innocence.
We've been too loose, hence the abuse,
Fallen short of His glory, duly accused.

In a world grossly depraved,
And ravaged by total moral decay,
Our values we've tossed to the wind,
Spitting in the face of age-old beliefs.
We've traded virtue for delinquency,
How do we not expect to lose our essence?

Explanation of “WE’VE LOST IT”

Stanza 1: In a world lost and greatly confused,
The truth is often misconstrued.
Before us now are several gods,
To choose from, all at our own accord.
The creation is what we now worship,
While the Creator, we reject His lordship.

Explanation: This stanza addresses the confusion and distortion of truth in modern society. It suggests that people are now faced with multiple “gods” or distractions, choosing to worship material and created things rather than the Creator (God).

This shift in focus signifies a rejection of spiritual and religious devotion in favor of idolizing worldly possessions and achievements.

Lost
Image by Jenny Toms from Pixabay

Stanza 2: In a world heavily invaded,
By lies and deceit, a gift from Hades,
Our conscience we’ve hushed into silence,
Leading to an inevitable rape of innocence.
We’ve been too loose, hence the abuse,
Fallen short of His glory, duly accused.

Explanation: This stanza delves into the infiltration of lies and deceit into society, metaphorically attributed to Hades (the underworld in Greek mythology). The poet laments how people have suppressed their conscience, leading to a loss of innocence and moral corruption.

The reference to being “too loose” implies a lack of moral restraint, resulting in widespread moral and ethical transgressions. The phrase “fallen short of His glory” indicates a failure to live up to divine standards, leading to rightful accusation.

Stanza 3: In a world grossly depraved,
And ravaged by total moral decay,
Our values we’ve tossed to the wind,
Spitting in the face of age-old beliefs.
We’ve traded virtue for delinquency,
How do we not expect to lose our essence?

Explanation: This stanza portrays a world suffering from severe moral decay and depravity. The poet criticizes the abandonment of traditional values and beliefs, which are dismissed with disdain (“spitting in the face of age-old beliefs”).

The exchange of virtue for delinquency indicates a preference for immoral or unethical behavior. The rhetorical question at the end suggests that losing one’s essence (core values and morality) is an inevitable consequence of such actions.

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