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I See It All, My Child: Free Verse Poem

I see the quilt you're wrapped in
And it's a heavy one of shame
The load of guilt you carry within
And how it has caused you pain
I see it, I see it all; my child

I see the battles you fight
And the scars that still bleed
The hot tears you shed at night
And the emptiness it leaves
I see it , I see it all; my child

I see the way your past haunts
Tormenting you at every turn
The way you always put on a front
And how exhausted you've become
I see it, I see it all; my child

I see beyond the forced smiles
And all your lies of been fine
The countless times you've tried to hide
From the demons hot on your behind
I see it, I see it all; my child

I see the way you struggle to breathe
Gasping through life in a bid to survive
Your heart is failing, breaking to bits
And worst of all, you fear you might die
I see it, I see it all; my child.

I See It All, My Child Explained

Stanza 1

“I see the quilt you’re wrapped in And it’s a heavy one of shame The load of guilt you carry within And how it has caused you pain I see it, I see it all; my child”

The speaker observes that the person they are addressing is burdened by shame and guilt. The metaphor of a heavy quilt illustrates the weight and pervasive nature of these feelings, indicating that this emotional burden is deeply embedded in the person’s life. The speaker acknowledges the pain that this shame and guilt have caused.

Stanza 2

“I see the battles you fight And the scars that still bleed The hot tears you shed at night And the emptiness it leaves I see it , I see it all; my child”

Here, the speaker recognizes the ongoing struggles and emotional wounds of the person. The “scars that still bleed” suggest unresolved traumas or issues that affect them deeply. The mention of “hot tears” and “emptiness” emphasizes the intense sorrow and loneliness experienced, especially in private moments.

Stanza 3

“I see the way your past haunts Tormenting you at every turn The way you always put on a front And how exhausted you’ve become I see it, I see it all; my child”

This stanza highlights the relentless nature of the person’s past, which continually haunts and torments them. Despite their efforts to appear strong and unaffected (“put on a front”), the speaker perceives the exhaustion and toll this facade takes on them.

I see it all
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Stanza 4

“I see beyond the forced smiles And all your lies of been fine The countless times you’ve tried to hide From the demons hot on your behind I see it, I see it all; my child”

The speaker can see through the person’s attempts to mask their true feelings with “forced smiles” and false assurances of being “fine.” The reference to “demons hot on your behind” suggests persistent and relentless inner struggles or fears that the person is trying to escape or conceal.

Stanza 5

“I see the way you struggle to breathe Gasping through life in a bid to survive Your heart is failing, breaking to bits, And worst of all, you fear you might die I see it, I see it all; my child.”

In the final stanza, the speaker notices the person’s desperate attempts to cope with life, likened to “struggling to breathe” and “gasping.” The metaphor of a “failing heart, breaking to bits” signifies profound emotional distress and a sense of hopelessness. The speaker acknowledges the person’s deepest fear—that these struggles might ultimately lead to their demise.

Overall, the poem is a compassionate and empathetic acknowledgment of the person’s hidden struggles, pain, and fears, offering a sense of understanding and visibility from the speaker.

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